gemot encubed  

Go Back   gemot encubed > Gemot > General Discussion

General Discussion Theres a Clannad of AIR-headed Kanon fodder being shot by the Little Busters After Tomoyo on a Planet-arian.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 2006-01-05, 10:49
DragonmasterX DragonmasterX is offline
Obsessive
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 221
Default What is a bank(teibou)?

Can someone describe in their own words what a bank is? Even after looking at the pictures at google, I still don't have a solid picture of this "bank" in my head. This is something I wondered everytime 堤防 came up in Air.

http://images.google.com/images?svnu...A4%9C%E7%B4%A2

Image search for the English "bank" brings up the financial institutions.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 2006-01-05, 11:09
inuyasha9854
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I'm guessing something like an embankment, or a river bank.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 2006-01-05, 12:43
Haeleth's Avatar
Haeleth Haeleth is offline
Ex-boss
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: England
Posts: 2,106
Default

Roughly equivalent to a "levee" (those things that Katrina breached in New Orleans) or a "dyke" (the sort they use in the Netherlands to keep the sea out, not the yuri sort).

In the specific case of AIR, it refers to the sea wall that separates the beach from the shop with the juice vending machine.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 2006-01-05, 12:53
GreatSaintLouis GreatSaintLouis is offline
Addicted
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 807
Default

Nitpicky question: Is the structure a 'dyke' or a 'dike'? I grew up on a freshwater marsh cris-crossed with the things, and I could've sworn it was 'dike'. Unless this is another one of thos 'color'/'colour'-type issues...
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 2006-01-05, 13:30
Haeleth's Avatar
Haeleth Haeleth is offline
Ex-boss
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: England
Posts: 2,106
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreatSaintLouis
Nitpicky question: Is the structure a 'dyke' or a 'dike'?
Yes. :P

In British English, at least, the two are completely interchangeable; Oxford style prefers 'dike', but recognises 'dyke' as "a frequent spelling", while other authorities prefer 'dyke'. It may of course be one of those cases where Americans accept only one of two spellings that are permissible in British English - not so much 'colo(u)r' as 'medi(a)eval' or 'Americani(s|z)e'.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 2006-01-05, 14:42
Shii's Avatar
Shii Shii is offline
Obsessive
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Cloudy Water
Posts: 497
Send a message via ICQ to Shii
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haeleth
It may of course be one of those cases where Americans accept only one of two spellings that are permissible in British English - not so much 'colo(u)r' as 'medi(a)eval' or 'Americani(s|z)e'.
In the northeastern U.S. at least, a dike is a wall and a dyke is a Sailor Scout.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 2006-01-05, 15:30
GreatSaintLouis GreatSaintLouis is offline
Addicted
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 807
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haeleth
It may of course be one of those cases where Americans accept only one of two spellings that are permissible in British English - not so much 'colo(u)r' as 'medi(a)eval' or 'Americani(s|z)e'.
That could possibly be it, or it could just be due to the ignorance of my contemporaries that I've never heard of any alternate spellings. Every time I use the word in a sentence, I'm usually rewarded with funny looks and entreaties not to say it so loud before have to I explain that it refers to a physical structure.

...yet another one of those fascinating words that's had its traditional meaning usurped by common colloquialisms.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 2006-01-06, 13:16
Claudio's Avatar
Claudio Claudio is offline
Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Argentina
Posts: 44
Default

For what I can tell you, "dyke" sounds very wrong, mainly because of it's pronunciation.
"Dique, dike" is correct for a dam-like structure that separates bodies of water (or water from something else), but "dyke", pronounced "daik" is, uh, definitely anglic in origin. I'm not familiar with any "daik" root in the grecorroman original tongues, though I'm not a linguist by any means.
__________________
Profeta de Pasibor
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 2006-01-06, 15:43
Guest
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Well, for those interested in the etymologies of dike and dyke.

dyke
1931, Amer.Eng., probably shortening of morphadike, dialectal garbling of hermaphrodite, but bulldyker "engage in lesbian activities" is attested from 1921, and a source from 1896 lists dyke as slang for "the vulva."

dike
O.E. dic "trench, ditch," from P.Gmc. *dik- (cf. O.N. diki, Du. dijk, Ger. Deich), from PIE base *dheigw- "to pierce, fasten" (cf. Skt. dehi- "wall," O.Pers. dida "wall, stronghold, fortress," Pers. diz). At first "an excavation," later (1487) applied to the resulting earth mound; a sense development paralleled by cognate forms in many other languages. This is the northern variant of the word, which in the south of England yielded ditch.

http://www.etymonline.com/

The American dyke has nothing to do with the British dyke (it's just a plain old variant of dike in British English).
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 2006-01-06, 15:48
Haeleth's Avatar
Haeleth Haeleth is offline
Ex-boss
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: England
Posts: 2,106
Default

Of course, etymonline (like most lexicographical sources) omits the American dyke/dike meaning "diagonal cutting pliers", which was the subject of several fascinating Language Log posts recently...

It's amazing how easy a thread is to derail, isn't it? :D
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 2006-01-06, 23:36
Carl Carl is offline
Obsessive
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 551
Send a message via MSN to Carl
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Claudio
For what I can tell you, "dyke" sounds very wrong, mainly because of it's pronunciation.
"Dique, dike" is correct for a dam-like structure that separates bodies of water (or water from something else), but "dyke", pronounced "daik" is, uh, definitely anglic in origin. I'm not familiar with any "daik" root in the grecorroman original tongues, though I'm not a linguist by any means.
In New Zealand it's always pronounced "daik".

English is quite a flexible little language.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 2006-01-07, 00:45
GreatSaintLouis GreatSaintLouis is offline
Addicted
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 807
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haeleth
Of course, etymonline (like most lexicographical sources) omits the American dyke/dike meaning "diagonal cutting pliers", which was the subject of several fascinating Language Log posts recently...
Wow, I had no idea about that one. "Diagonal cutting pliers" - sounds like some sort of metal shears or tin snips or something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haeleth
It's amazing how easy a thread is to derail, isn't it? :D
Bear witness to half the fun (and all of the danger!) of the Internet!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl
English is quite a flexible little language.
Or deeply flawed, depending on how your glass is filled. It really makes me appreciate learning Japanese - words only have ONE possible pronunciation! And half the time, the words are made up of little pictures that give you the meaning! Beautiful!!

All we get in English are there, they're, and their.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 2006-01-07, 00:53
Shii's Avatar
Shii Shii is offline
Obsessive
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Cloudy Water
Posts: 497
Send a message via ICQ to Shii
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreatSaintLouis
It really makes me appreciate learning Japanese - words only have ONE possible pronunciation!
But "letters" have usually a dozen pronunciations...
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 2006-01-07, 03:02
GreatSaintLouis GreatSaintLouis is offline
Addicted
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 807
Default

True. What I was attempting to get at and failed (due to my own incompetence, not the shortcomings of English) is that each syllable/character is pronounced only one way (i.e. く, 'ku') and therefore words only have one possible pronunciation - 行く, (いく) is always 'iku', for example.

The catch, as you mentioned, is in the myriad of possible meanings kanji can carry, in which case yes, the pronunciation of the word does change. But it still adheres to the static pronunciation of the syllables that make up the word.

I shouldn't try to discuss even my shaky grasp of linguistic concepts at 3am. I'm not sure if anything I just wrote made a damn lick of sense.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 2006-01-07, 03:16
Haeleth's Avatar
Haeleth Haeleth is offline
Ex-boss
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: England
Posts: 2,106
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GSL
each syllable/character is pronounced only one way (i.e. く, 'ku') and therefore words only have one possible pronunciation - 行く, (いく) is always 'iku', for example.
Except when it's 'yuku'. :P

There are some genuine inconsistencies. ん can be any of [n], [N], [m], [j~], [a~], [i~], [u~], [e~], [o~], and probably a few others. I admit that's not quite analogous to English inconsistencies in that it's possible to deduce the pronunciation of most syllables if you know the basic rules of Japanese phonetics, which is not the case for English "-ough". But can you tell me how the following sentence is pronounced, given your knowledge that "each syllable/character is pronounced only one way"?

はははははははがいたいと言う

</evil>
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:35.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.