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General Discussion Theres a Clannad of AIR-headed Kanon fodder being shot by the Little Busters After Tomoyo on a Planet-arian.

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  #61  
Old 2010-07-09, 14:05
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your at a website for them.
its another word for erogame or bishojyo game.
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  #62  
Old 2010-07-09, 21:03
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Which is a kinda less frequently encountered word to describe these games. Although if it was all guy oriented, it wouldn't be called galgame.
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  #63  
Old 2010-07-10, 01:40
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Here's how I learned Japanese. I didn't take any classes.

First I've studied Japanese for Busy People I-III. These are easy to understand and give you grammar and basic vocabulary. Then I watched lots of dramas and animes to increase my vocabulary. Then I started playing galgames. You don't need to know any kanji to be able to read them. There are great tools that automatically insert furigana into kanji. Search for "Furigana Inserter" or "Translation Aggregator". Furigana are small characters that explain how to read a word.

You certainly don't need any classes. The most important thing is to have fun during the process. Most people give up because they are not having fun. Learning kanji the hardest thing for most people, that's what makes Japanese so hard. But if you aren't going to write Japanese, then you don't need to learn them. As I said there are great tools for reading Japanese.
Thanks for the info on the galgame stuff.
Crap edit:

God I got to stay motivated

Just can't depend on my lazy self >.<

Last edited by fujifruit; 2010-07-10 at 04:57.
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  #64  
Old 2010-07-10, 13:45
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In Japan, galge is sometimes used to refer to bishoujo games which are all-ages.
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  #65  
Old 2010-07-10, 14:02
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In Japan, galge is sometimes used to refer to bishoujo games which are all-ages.
I see :o

-Thanks! ^_^
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  #66  
Old 2010-07-17, 23:04
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Has anyone got any recommendations for dictionaries?
I'm getting Kodansha's Kanji learners dictionary first, but i'd also like a jap-jap dictionary* and an electronic one (I heard you can get a cheap one for the DS. The standalone electronic dictionaries are kinda expensive >.> ). If you can be bothered, please provide some links to sites selling them and shipping to Europe, too.

*Preferably something big, heavy and awe-inspiring.
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  #67  
Old 2010-07-18, 00:01
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The kanji dictionary on the DS is actually pretty nice, but it doesn't feel as easy to use as the Japanese-Japanese dictionary that comes with Mac OS X Leopard (and later). Usually, if I have Internet and don't have access to the Mac dictionary, I prefer to use http://dic.yahoo.co.jp/ as that has most of the dictionaries in one place. If you want big and awe-inspiring (but probably pretty bad for the introductory Japanese learner), you want the Green Goddess. It's heavy, it's expensive, and apparently a lot of translators swear by it. (I actually don't like it as much)
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  #68  
Old 2010-07-18, 00:56
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The Green Goddess (Kenkyusha's 新和英大辞典 now in 5th ed) is pretty much a waste of money for someone learning the language. Sure it's got the largest word count in publication. But it means little to someone learning.

Translators often swear by it because when you've got to deal with an obscure term that almost never comes up in everyday usage, you're most likely to find it there w/ potential candidate words to translate it into. (It takes a bit more effort to look something up in a Japanese dictionary, esp. a specialized one for jargon, and trying to work out a proper translation on your own.)

For someone learning, they're not going to use, or even see, probably 80-90% of the words in the GG. Go for something cheaper, in the right physical size as you're willing to carry around. If you ever get to the point where you start needing to work with uncommon words, then start looking at more expensive specialized tools.
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  #69  
Old 2010-07-18, 01:41
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Well as I remember this is what I did to reach my current situation... everything was a result of my self studying.

1. learn kana
2. grammar, grammar..
3. read and watch some raw meats...

You really don't need to remember any kanji at all since there are too many resources out there, and most likely you will remember it one by one through the process, and then I got hook up on manga translating, well I really need to look up the words with dictionary. it's easy to learn if you're having fun with it. unlike me who didn't have any fun at all. But, I really am grateful for that.
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Last edited by appztetra; 2011-05-14 at 01:24.
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  #70  
Old 2010-07-18, 11:11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agilis View Post
The Green Goddess (Kenkyusha's 新和英大辞典 now in 5th ed) is pretty much a waste of money for someone learning the language. Sure it's got the largest word count in publication. But it means little to someone learning.

Translators often swear by it because when you've got to deal with an obscure term that almost never comes up in everyday usage, you're most likely to find it there w/ potential candidate words to translate it into. (It takes a bit more effort to look something up in a Japanese dictionary, esp. a specialized one for jargon, and trying to work out a proper translation on your own.)

For someone learning, they're not going to use, or even see, probably 80-90% of the words in the GG. Go for something cheaper, in the right physical size as you're willing to carry around. If you ever get to the point where you start needing to work with uncommon words, then start looking at more expensive specialized tools.
I definitely have to second that. I've made ample use of the Green Goddes as he calls it, and it was certainly worth my money, but I do use it professionally. It's at my side at all times.

However, it certainly is not very friendly at all to anyone learning Japanese since you have to know how to read the word at all before you can even look it up in the GG in the first place.

That said, if you're the type of person who studied and learned English by going from cover to cover of the Webster's English Dictionary, then it could certainly be useful to you. But I know I couldn't have learned Japanese from it.
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  #71  
Old 2011-08-24, 23:02
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I just started learning Japanese myself using the link Asceai posted on the first page.

I already tried learning a couple of months ago, but at the time I didn't have enough motivation to keep me going. But this time, I'm going non-stop. I've studying a little bit everyday for at least 2 hours, and I think I'm doing pretty well.

Yes, maybe taking a course would be the best way to learn, but I don't really have enough money for it.... And I don't really feel like sitting in a classroom. XD

But I'm enjoying myself. I haven't felt this happy and satisfied in a looong time. This time, I think I have the energy to keep going till the end.

Also, I'm going to do what another poster here did, by sticking post-it notes around my house with different kanji stuck on objects representing them. I think that might be a good way to memorize them. I already write down every kanji I know, as well as different phrases using them and whatnot (mostly answers to the exercises in that link), and it really helps to write them down and review them later, since doing so develops your long-term memory.
So ya, that's a good method, methinks.

After learning the basics, I plan on playing through Hanahira, since it seems to be quite simple to read, while looking up new words and such.

EDIT: God man, learning Kanji is hard as shiiit.... I gotta stay motivated. x___x

Last edited by Metaler; 2011-08-28 at 22:06.
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  #72  
Old 2011-09-03, 11:38
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I wrote a guide to reading visual novels in Japanese way back last year...
http://visualnovelaer.wordpress.com/...by-step-guide/
Maybe people might find it helpful
note: people use ITH now, not AGTH
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  #73  
Old 2011-09-04, 00:19
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I've already gone through Tae Kim's basic guide. Now, I'm attempting to read Hanahira with the help of ITH (thanks for the suggestion!). It's taking me time, especially because I write down every new Kanji I see, and sometimes even ones I've seen before, in order to train my muscle memory. It works, but, like I said, it takes time. I'll try using your method, with Anki. Seems pretty reliable!
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  #74  
Old 2011-09-04, 14:24
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Everyone's given some really good advice. I'm going to try and offer some alternate approaches just so we have more to choose from.

My first language is actually Chinese. I moved to Australia at the age of ten. Back then, I knew no English, so school was really tough. Now, I was given special English classes, but I found they didn't help me that much. The thing that really helped me was just hanging out with friends who speak English. At first, I wanted to stay in my comfort zone, so I stuck with other Chinese people, once that changed, that was when I started to see improvement.

So, maybe we could try the same approach for learning other languages, including Japanese. Of course, like everyone has suggested, we'll need to learn hiragana and katakana first. I actually studied Japanese during high school. Back then, I was lazy, and I learned hiragana literally the day before my hiragana test. I remember sitting on my bed and memorizing all the hiragana in one afternoon. No special technique or anything like that, just memorizing out of desperation. So, you can do it, too!

After that, maybe consider forcing yourself out of your comfort zone. Being about to read is great, but trying to communicate with a Japanese person is another story, and it can still be a bit scary. So, just throw yourself in there and have a go. Get on social networks and find people with common interests. Many Japanese people are keen on learning English, too! Through tons of stumbling and making mistakes, you'll become comfortable. If you're up for it, some people are even down for chatting on Skype, etc. Once you master all that, you can read, write and speak the language. I reckon that's not too bad.
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  #75  
Old 2011-09-05, 17:47
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Ok, so here's what I started doing: I'm pasting every new Kanji I find on a deck I made on Anki, so that I can review them later. Now, the question is, should I keep adding Kanji to the same deck? Or should I make new ones for every time I play?
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